Thursday

Ann Ross
Tai Chi
9:30–10:30
Fellowship Hall or Youth Room

Tai Chi is a slow-moving meditation to improve health, balance, and spirit. From the gentle practice of postures, you will learn about your physical and spiritual center.  This class is geared toward continuing students.

Philosophy of  Government
Fredrica Rice
9:30-10:45
Room B4

Why are theories about human nature and about government always connected?  What are the two big questions of political philosophy?  What do we expect governments to do for us?  We will look at theories from Plato to Rousseau to Marx and the present and discuss the role of government in our lives.
There is a $10 copying fee payable to the instructor.

Selected Stories by Anton Chekhov
Jim Leonard
9:15-10:45
Room B2

Widely considered the world’s greatest short story author, Anton Chekov wrote hundreds of tales depicting Russian life.  His characters are ordinary people, both clerks and clerics, peasants and pensioners.  But his stories are compassionate — no sermonizing, no heroes.  Among the stories we’ll read are Gooseberries, Ward No. 6, Peasants, The Student, the Bishop, About Love, Gusev, and 12 more.

The text for this class is Selected Stories of Anton Chekhov, Modern Library 2000, paperback.  Translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky.
Class Limit: 20

Thomas Mann’s Dr Faustus
Bruce Bigley
11:00-12:30
Room B2

In his last completed novel, Thomas Mann, living in exile in Los Angeles,  responds to the rise of the National Socialism in Germany and to World War II.   His Faust figure is Dr. Adrian Leverkuhn, a composer, loosely based on Schönberg, who makes his pact with infernal powers to achieve breakthroughs in modern music.

Text is available from  new, used, and on-line. bookstores, as well as the library.  Of the two translations, I prefer the Woods  to Lowe-Porter, but either is adequate.
Class Limit: 25 

Intermediate Piano Keyboarding
Jeanne Bryan
11:00-12:15
Room B5

Piano keyboarding theory for intermediate students who have previously taken piano keyboarding and have knowledge of note-reading and piano keys. Enrollment of new students requires Instructor’s approval — please contact LLC office to discuss.

Henrik Ibsen, Father of Modern Drama
Bruce Bigley
1:00-2:30
Room B4

A reading of Ibsen’s Pillars of Society, Doll’s House, and Ghosts. These three plays established Ibsen, who was already well known in Scandinavia, as a figure of world importance and established what has become the dominant mode of the modern realist play.    Students will need to find copies of the plays.   Note that Ibsen’s plays are published in collections, and you won’t necessarily find all three of these plays in the same volume.   Look for Ibsen, not the play title.  There are many translations, and those you are likely to encounter are adequate.  Pillars of Society will be the hardest to find, and the one we will spend the least time on.  Parts 2 and 3 to follow in winter and spring.
Class Limit:  25

Watercolor Basics
Cecile Disenhouse
11:00-1:00
Room B4

Same as Session 1 (see Wednesday class description)
Class Limit: 25

Creative Writing
Vel Gerth
11:00-12:45
Room 1-J

Write spontaneously through prompts, outline, or from lines of poetry and prose. No corrections of work, only praise for a word or line. We learn by doing and creating, and encourage each other to write in our unique voices.
Class Limit: 15

Watercolor Basics
Cecile Disenhouse
1:15-3:15
Session 3
Room B4

Same as Session 1 (see Wednesday class description)
Class Limit: 25

Film: Problem, We Have a  Huston
Jim Mohundro
1:00-3:30
Room B5

The earliest dynasty was the Ming Dynasty, in which Ming the Merciless invented the Ming vase, and the patent’s profits enabled him and his daughter, Princess Aura to rule the Planet Mongo — until their reign was ended by Flash Gordon and his beautiful companion, Dale Arden. Then the Barrymores, Redgraves and Hustons came to films, and Drew’s, Vanessa’s and Angelica’s acting chops continue to represent their clans.

  • Dodsworth (1936, 101 minutes)
  • The Maltese Falcon (1941, 100 minutes)
  • The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948, 126 minutes) The Asphalt Jungle (1950, 112 minutes)
  • Moulin Rouge (1952, 119 minutes)
  • Beat the Devil (1953, 89 minutes)
  • The Man Who Would be King (1975, 129 minutes) Prizzi’s Honor (1985, 130 minutes)

There will be an optional class discussion following each film.

Each film will include subtitles or closed captioning as an aid for the hearing impaired.

Women and Poetry in Daily Living
Margot Dick
1:30-3:30
Room 1-J

A peaceful oasis for sharing poetry from international writers and our own hand and heart if we are so inclined. A safe place for women to express and let their voices be heard with love of language, insight, humor and observation.

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