Thursdays

January 11 – March 1, 2018

Advanced Tai Chi
Ann Ross

9:30-10:30
Room to be determined

Tai Chi is a slow-moving meditation to improve health, balance, and spirit. From the gentle practice of postures, you will learn about your physical and spiritual center. This class is geared toward continuing students.

Contemporary Short Stories
Jim Leonard

9:30-10:45
Room B2

In this class we’ll read and discuss fifteen outstanding short stories written by Raymond Carver, Louise Erdrich, William Faulkner, Lorrie Moore, Flannery O’Conner, Philip Roth, John Updike and eight other great American authors.

Text: The Oxford Book of American Short Stories, Second Edition 2013, edited by Joyce Carol Oates.

Class limit: 15

Think—Exploring the Problems of Philosophy
Fredrica Rice

9:30-10:45
Room B4

Explore ideas through a contemporary philosopher’s work.  We will read Think by Simon Blackburn and find out whether we agree with him or not on problems such as knowledge, responsibility, ethics, and others.  Think is a little book, conversational in style, and easy reading.  Blackburn will acquaint you with some famous thinkers.  Come have fun with philosophy!

Class limit: 15

James Joyce’s Ulysses (continued)
Bruce Bigley

11:00-12:30
Room B2

We will continue our reading of Ulysses, reading the next six or seven episodes, covering the actions of Stephen and Leopold through the afternoon and early evening of Bloomsday.  Students who have not taken the fall quarter class, but who wish to join us, should contact the instructor at Bigley43@gmail.com.

Text: James Joyce, Ulysses, any edition, edited by Gabler

Class limit: 25

Intermediate
Piano Keyboarding
Jeanne Bryan

11:00-12:15
Room B5

Piano keyboarding theory for intermediate students who have previously taken piano keyboarding and have knowledge of note-reading and piano keys. Enrollment of new students requires instructor’s approval — please contact LLC office to discuss.

Creative Writing
Vel Gerth

11:00-12:45
Room 1-J

Write spontaneously through prompts, outlines, or from lines of poetry and prose. No corrections of work, only praise for a word or line. We learn by doing and creating, and encourage each other to write in our unique voices.

Class limit: 15

Watercolor Basics
Cecile Disenhouse

11:00-1:00
Session 2
Room B4

No experience necessary. Beginning instruction includes description of supplies, composition, use of color, washes, wet into wet, and ink with watercolor. Artists of any level are welcome to participate in the class. The instructor demonstrates mainly landscapes, cityscapes and the odd animal. Students can visit http://www.Disenhouse.org to see instructor’s work. The morning and afternoon sessions are the same.

Class limit: 25

Re-Learning to Enjoy Poetry
Bruce Bigley

1:00-2:30

Room B2

Many of us have anxiety about poetry and avoid it. Yet the first literature we responded to was poetry—Mother Goose or Dr. Seuss.  Perhaps you remember classes in which it seemed the teacher and a few students had the code book you somehow missed out on.  There is no code book.  Often, the poems that lovers of poetry enjoy the most are the ones they cannot explain. This class will help you re-awaken the joy we have lost in the pleasure of words in poetry.

 

Watercolor Basics
Cecile Disenhouse

1:15-3:15
Room B4

Session 3

This afternoon class (1:15pm-3:15 pm) is the same as Watercolor Basics Session 2 (held at 11:00am)
Class limit: 25

Film: Trials on Film
Jim Mohundro

1:00-3:30
Room B5

There are trials by jury, trials by judge(s), trials both in and out of courtrooms, and metaphorical trials by fire.  In life some trials are over in a day, some take months.

At best a film often has only a couple of hours to focus on immediate outcome.  There will be winners and losers and the writer, director, film editor and actors must provide logic and momentum for the audience’s cinematic journey to a trial’s conclusion.  Here are trials in different times and places.  We’ll view:

The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928, 82 minutes), The Life of Emile Zola (1937, 107 minutes), The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941, 107 minutes), The Ox-Bow Incident (1943, 75 minutes), The Winslow Boy (1948, 117 minutes), Adam’s Rib (1949, 101 minutes), Inherit the Wind  (1960, 128 minutes), and Michael Clayton (2007, 119 minutes).

There will be an optional class discussion following each film. Each film will include subtitles or close captioning as an aid for the hearing impaired.

Women and Poetry in Daily Living
Margot Dick

1:30-3:00
Room B-2

A peaceful oasis for sharing poetry from international writers and our own hands and hearts if we are so inclined. A safe place for women to express and let their voices be heard with love of language, insight, humor and observation.

Register Here

 *Note:  Be sure to read class information for Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays  before you use the register link. For errors please email us at: lifetimelearningcenter@gmail.com