Wednesdays

March 29-May 17

Beginning Bridge
Ted Szatrowski

9:00-10:30
Room B5

This class is for individuals who may or may not have played bridge before but would like to learn. We will start by learning point count, basic bidding, and some basic bridge conventions. Students learn the game by playing. We play bridge for fun – and downplay the competitive aspects. You will make new friends, improve your memory and have a wonderful time.

Finding Reality in the Legends of Ancient Greece
Carol Thomas

9:30-10:45
Room B4

The most exciting point to make about the Mycenaeans is that they actually existed. These facts have only recently been demonstrated. Only sixty years ago, many people would have agreed with the view of classical scholar, Samuel Basset, that “the persuasively realistic heroic world of The Iliad and The Odyssey are merely sublime fiction.” The decipherment of the script on clay tablets preserved at several of the Bronze Age sites enhances the view that Greeks of the Classical Age can legitimately trace their story to a much earlier time. Dr. Carol Thomas is a recently -retired professor from the University Washington and a new faculty member to Lifetime Learning Center. Handouts are provided.

Intermediate  Bridge
Ted Szatrowski

10:45-12:15
Room B5

This class is for bridge players who have some bridge knowledge.

Class Limit: 28

Euripides: The Trojan Women and Other Plays
Bobbie Simone        

10:45-12:15
Room B2

This class includes readings and discussion of three plays of the great Greek classical dramatist Euripides: The Trojan Women, Medea, and Electra.

Required text: Ten Plays by Euripides, translated by Paul Roche, Signet Classics (required)
Recommended Text: Edith Hamilton’s Mythology.

Those Were the Days, My Friend
Julianne Seeman

Room B4
11:00-12:15

This course will explore memoir writing. Participants will write about their life experiences based on prompts, reading and in-class writing. They are welcome to share their writing with others in a safe and positive environment. The class is taught by a new instructor, Julianne See-man, retired English and Creative Writing Professor from Bellevue College.
Class Limit: 15

 Understanding the Ups and Downs of the Financial Markets
Amy Spanne

11:00-12:15
1-J

How do financial markets work? The first five classes provide basic information on our market economy. In the final three sessions, participants will choose topics of interest for further exploration. Topics may be global or personal and might include: stock picking, current trends in national markets, reverse mortgages, Social Security, or estate planning. Amy Spanne, who is not affiliated with any investment company, is in the process of obtaining her Certified Financial Planning Certificate.

Class Limit: 10

Board Games and More!

1:00-3:00
Room B5

Interested in a game of Scrabble, Sequence, Cribbage, Pictionary, Seattleopoly, Sorry, or other board games? Individuals in search of a challenge and some fun, contact our office!  No Fee.

The Argentine Tango
Sonny Newman

1:00-3:00
*Lake City Community Center

Join Sonny Newman for an introductory class to one of the great Argentine gifts to the world of dance. Connect with others, improve your balance and memory skills, and explore the creative side of dance. You will learn basic steps and practice with fellow classmates, but more importantly will have fun! Partners not required, but welcome!  Sonny Newman is a renown Argentine dance teacher in the Seattle area.

This class is held in cooperation with Sound Generations and Lake City Seniors. Classes are held at :

*Lake City Community Center
12531 28th Avenue NE, Seattle 98125

Weekend Wall Street Journal
Steve Camp and Walle Ralkowski

1:15-2:30
Room B4

This class will dive into The Weekend Wall Street Journal, beginning with the Saturday, March 25 edition. All 4 sections will be explored (Front section on World and US News; Business and Finance; Review; and Off Duty). Class members volunteering to discuss highlights of articles and stories of general interest from the previous Saturday Weekend  Edition.

Class Limit: 15

The All of It by Jeannette Haien
Michael Shurgot

1:15-2:30
Room B2

When it was published in 1987, Jeannette Haien’s The All of It won the Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction. Haien’s novel is set in rural Ireland, and tells a tale in beautiful, haunting prose of transgression, empathy, deception, and ultimately absolution. The New York Times Book Review praised the novel as “An elegantly written, compact, and often subtle tale of morality and passion that gives voice to an age-old concern in a fresh way,” and the writer Guy Davenport termed it “a beautiful little novel—perfection itself—a distinct and glorious triumph.”

The book is in print and can be ordered from Ravenna Third Place Books. Students must purchase their own copy.
Class Limit: 30

The Choral Music of J.S. Bach

Charles Roxin

1:15-2:30
Room B2

Some scholars compare Bach to the achievements of Isaac Newton. Bach’s best grades in school, other than music, were in science and math. He could combine sublime abstraction and complete clarity with intense emotion. The warmth and intense emotionality of his choral music, two generations after the Thirty Years’ War, is no accident. He lived in that part of Germany that lost 30% of its population to war, disease and starvation. The reality of death and how to manage feelings towards it, and heal, are central to his choral writing. Join us for an exploration of the range of this music. We will end with what could be called his Seattle Cantata: an ode to the wonders of coffee and coffee house culture.

To register for classes please select

Spring Classes 2017